Apr 26, 2019
Professor Zhenan Bao
Professor Zhenan Bao (Stanford) visited UCLA on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, to give the Spring 2019 Distinguished Lecture.
 
Over 400 faculty, students, and researchers attended Bao’s lecture titled "Skin-Inspired Materials and Devices” in the UCLA California NanoSystems Institute auditorium.  A photo gallery from the event can be viewed here and select photos can be viewed below. 
 
Bao's Distinguished Lecture was titled "Skin-Inspired Materials and Devices”.
 
Dr. Zhenan Bao is a K.K. Lee Professor of Chemical Engineering, and by courtesy, a Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Material Science and Engineering at Stanford University. Prior to joining Stanford in 2004, she was a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies from 1995-2004. She received her Ph.D in Chemistry from the University of Chicago in 1995. She has over 450 refereed publications and over 60 US patents. She pioneered a number of design concepts for organic electronic materials. Her work has enabled flexible electronic circuits and displays. In her recent work, she has developed skin-inspired organic electronic materials, which resulted in unprecedented performance or functions in medical devices, energy storage and environmental applications. Bao is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Inventors. She was selected as Nature’s Ten people who mattered in 2015 as a “Master of Materials” for her work on artificial electronic skin. Bao was awarded ACS Award on Applied Polymer Science 2017, the L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Award in the Physical Sciences 2017. She is a co-founder and on the Board of Directors for C3 Nano and PyrAmes, both are silicon-valley venture funded start-ups. 
 
At the lecture, Department Chair Professor Catherine Clarke gave the welcoming remarks, followed by Professor Richard Kaner’s introduction of Bao. After a question and answer period, Clarke presented Bao with an engraved crystal plaque. A reception followed the lecture in the CNSI lobby.  
 
Professor Richard Kaner introduced Bao. Faculty, students, researchers, and alumni attended the lecture.
 
With the CNSI auditorium filled to capacity, over 100 people listened to Bao’s lecture which was streamed in the lobby.
 
The lecture was followed by a Q&A session and then Clarke presented Bao with a crystal award.
 
At the reception following the lecture – Richard Kaner, Dean of Physical Sciences Miguel Garcia-Garibay,  Catherine Clarke, Zhenan Bao, Ken Houk, and Paul Weiss.
 
About the Distinguished Lecture Series
The UCLA Chemistry & Biochemistry Distinguished Lecture Series is a department-wide colloquium in a special week once per quarter when there are no other seminars in our department. Since beginning the series in 2013, we have invited some of the world’s most accomplished and engaging scientists to speak - Nobel Laureate Frances Arnold (Caltech), David Baker (University of Washington), Jacqueline Barton (Caltech), Nobel Laureate Thomas Cech (University of Colorado, Boulder), Francois Diederich (ETH Zurich), Harry Gray (Caltech), Sharon Hammes-Schiffer (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Barry Honig (Columbia), Nobel Laureate Roger Kornberg (Stanford), Yi Lu (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Victoria Orphan (Caltech), Kimberly Prather (UCSD, Scripps), Douglas Rees (Caltech), JoAnne Stubbe (MIT), George Whitesides (Harvard). Their lectures have consistently encouraged thought-provoking conversations and ideas
 
We are lining up a great group of speakers for our 2019-2020 Distinguished Lecture Series, who will be announced soon. The lectures are open to the public. While the research covered in the lectures is meant to appeal to a broad range of chemists and biochemists, the lectures also include a general introduction to the research for those who are further separated in research expertise. For more information, visit the Distinguished Lecture series website.
 
Article and photos by Penny Jennings, UCLA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, penny@chem.ucla.edu.