Aug 14, 2019
Royce Hall
UCLA's Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Structural Biology program PhD outcome data featured in ASBMB Today.
 
BMSB graduate program Ph.D. outcome statistics were featured in the article titled “Ph.D. Outcomes – one university at a time" which was published in the August 2019 issue of ASBMB Todaythe American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s (ASBMB) monthly magazine.
 
In order to provide a snapshot from around the country, the author asked biochemistry and molecular biology departments at universities across the U.S. to submit information about where their students go after earning a Ph.D. degree.
 
Former Department Chair Professor Catherine F. Clarke’s response about UCLA's Biochemistry, Molecular and Structural Biology (BMSB) graduate program Ph.D. outcomes was featured first in the article:
 
Excerpted from ASBMB Today by Comfort Dorn:
 
University of California, Los Angeles
The biochemistry, molecular and structural biology graduate program at the University of California, Los Angeles, tracks the career paths of our Ph.D. alumni. Research-active BMSB faculty have reported on 325 alumni spanning the years of 1971 to 2018. More than 32% of these alumni currently are employed in industry, 18% are in academic research and teaching, 13% do research in an academic or government lab, and 13% are postdoctoral fellows. Of the remaining alumni, 5% teach at a college or university, 5% work in medical or healthcare professions, 4% work in law/patent/financial institutions, 2% are consultants and 7% are categorized as other/unknown. Data from recent 2015 to 2018 graduates indicate that nearly 50% start their careers as postdocs and 33% get a position in industry. Our graduate students invite alumni from diverse backgrounds and careers to give seminars about their career paths. This facilitates networking among our current students, faculty and alumni and generates internships and support.
 
- Catherine Clarke, Professor and Chair
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
 
Other universities featured in the article were the Pennsylvania State University, Washington University in St. Louis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UC San Diego, and the Ohio State University.
 
Penny Jennings, UCLA Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, penny@chem.ucla.edu.