May 17, 2019
Prof. Ian Manners
Professor Ian Manners (University of Victoria) gave the 2019 Ray and Dorothy Wilson Inorganic Lecture on May 8, 2019.
 
His lecture titled “Functional Nanoscale and Hierarchical Materials by Living Crystallization-Driven Self-Assembly” was held in the Cram Conference Room.
 
A native of England, Professor Ian Manners is transitioning from Professor and Chair of Inorganic, Macromolecular and Materials Chemistry in the School of Chemistry at the University of Bristol, United Kingdom, to Professor and Canada 150 Research Chair in Materials Science at the University of Victoria, Canada. His research interests focus on the development of new synthetic approaches involving catalysis and self-assembly and their applications in molecular chemistry, polymer and materials science, and nanoscience. In his lecture, Manners described recent developments concerning a promising “seeded growth” route to well-defined 1D and 2D particles and hierarchical assemblies termed “living” crystallization-driven self-assembly (CDSA). 
 
Professor Ian Manners (center) with Inorganic Chemistry faculty members with (from left) Professors Jeffrey Zink, Alexander Spokoyny, Chong Liu, Paula Diaconescu and Xiangfeng Duan.
 
Spokoyny gave the history of Ray and Dorothy Wilson’s contributions to the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and introduced Manners.
 
Manners’ lecture was titled “Functional Nanoscale and Hierarchical Materials by Living Crystallization-Driven Self-Assembly”.
 
About Raymond and Dorothy Wilson
The Raymond and Dorothy Wilson Inorganic Lecture was initiated in 2019 thanks to an endowment established by long-time supporters of the UCLA Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Raymond A. Wilson '43, and his wife, Dorothy A. Wilson. In addition to funding the Raymond and Dorothy Wilson Inorganic Lecture and the Hawthorne Lectures (established in 2004), several undergraduates are able to conduct summer research in our research labs each year thanks to the Raymond & Dorothy Wilson Research Fellowships. Through their generosity, the Wilsons have built a solid legacy in the department that is also a lasting tribute to the UCLA chemistry professors who, more than seventy years ago, had such a profound impact on Raymond when he was a bright young chemistry student. 
 
 
 
Lecture photos and article by Penny Jennings, UCLA Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, penny@chem.ucla.edu.