Sep 30, 2019
Professor Richard Kaner with Professor Kenneth Suslick
Professor Richard Kaner recently presented the 2019-20 Suslick-Sessler Lecture in Materials Chemistry at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.
 
After Kaner’s lecture on September 17, 2019, titled "Exploring the Synthesis and Applications of Graphene", Professor Kenneth Suslick presented Kaner with a framed poster for the event. The Suslick-Sessler Lecture was established to honor Suslick who is the Marvin T. Schmidt Research Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Materials Science & Engineering, and Professor of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science & Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. Suslick is the world's leading expert on the chemical and physical effects of ultrasound.
 
A UCLA distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and of materials science and engineering, Kaner holds the Dr. Myung Ki Hong Endowed Chair in Materials Innovation. He is co-founder of Nanotech Energy, a company that is working to move the Kaner group’s cutting-edge research on graphene-based energy storage devices from the laboratory to the marketplace. Earlier this year Kaner was named the recipient of the American Institute of Chemists (AIC) 2019 Chemical Pioneer Award. To learn more about the Kaner group’s research, visit their website.
 
(Left) Professor Kenneth S. Suslick presented Professor Richard Kaner with a framed poster for the lecture. (Right) Kaner and Susick are shown holding a large model of graphite which Kaner brought to his lecture. A single layer of the graphite structure is known as graphene, the subject of Kaner's lecture. 
 
The annual Suslick-Sessler campus lectureship for materials chemistry was created with an endowment by Professor Jonathan L. Sessler, the Roland K. Pettit Professor of Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin, in honor of Professor Kenneth Suslick. Previous Suslick-Sessler Lecturers include Krzysztof Matyjaszewski (Carnegie Melon), Robert Langer (MIT), and James Collman (Stanford).
 
 
Penny Jennings, UCLA Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, penny@chem.ucla.edu.