Undergraduate Courses

 

Lower Division Courses

2. Introductory Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Not open to students with credit for course 14A or 20A. Concept of submicroscopic world of chemistry, ranging from protons to proteins in subject matter. P/NP or letter grading.

7. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Laboratory. (2)

Seminar, discussion, and laboratory, 32 hours. Limited to high school students. Key concepts of nanoscience and nanotechnology, including various approaches to nanofabrication (bottom-up and top-down). Fabrication of nanostructures and devices, collection of scientific data using those devices, analysis of data, and presentations of student results. Offered in summer only. P/NP grading.

14A. Atomic and Molecular Structure, Equilibria, Acids, and Bases. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: high school chemistry or equivalent background and three and one-half years of high school mathematics. Not open to students with credit for course 20A. Introduction to physical and general chemistry principles; atomic structure based on quantum mechanics; atomic properties; trends in periodic table; chemical bonding (Lewis structures, VSEPR theory, hybridization, and molecular orbital theory); gaseous and aqueous equilibria; properties of inorganic and organic acids, bases, buffers; titrations. P/NP or letter grading.

14B. Thermodynamics, Electrochemistry, Kinetics, and Organic Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 14A with grade of C- or better. Enforced corequisite: Mathematics 3A or 31A. Not open to students with credit for course 20A, 20B, or 30A. Phase changes; thermochemistry; first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics; free energy changes; electrochemistry and its role as energy source; chemical kinetics, including catalysis, reaction mechanisms, and enzymes; coordination compounds; general classes and naming of organic molecules; structure, conformations, and relative energies of organic molecules; application of thermodynamics and kinetics to organic and biochemical reactions; use of molecular modeling software to illustrate molecular structures and their relative energies. P/NP or letter grading.

14BL. General and Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. (3)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 14A with grade of C- or better. Enforced corequisite: course 14B. Not open to students with credit for course 20L. Introduction to volumetric, spectrophotometric, and potentiometric analysis. Use and preparation of buffers and pH meters. Synthesis and kinetics techniques using compounds of interest to students in life sciences. P/NP or letter grading.

14C. Structure of Organic Molecules. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 14B with grade of C- or better. Not open to students with credit for course 30A. Continuing studies in structure of organic molecules, with emphasis on biological applications. Resonance, stereochemistry, conjugation, and aromaticity; spectroscopy (NMR, IR, and mass spectrometry); introduction to effects of structure on physical and chemical properties; survey of biomolecular structure. P/NP or letter grading.

14CL. General and Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. (4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Enforced requisites: courses 14B and 14BL, with grades of C- or better. Enforced corequisite: course 14C. Synthesis and analysis of compounds; purification by extraction, chromatography, recrystallization, and sublimation; characterization by mass spectroscopy, UV, NMR, and IR spectroscopy, optical activity, electrochemistry, pH titration. P/NP or letter grading.

14D. Organic Reactions and Pharmaceuticals. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 14C with grade of C- or better. Organic reactions, nucleophilic and electrophilic substitutions and additions; electrophilic aromatic substitutions, carbonyl reactions, catalysis, molecular basis of drug action, and organic chemistry of pharmaceuticals. P/NP or letter grading.

17. Chemical Principles. (No credit)

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, two hours. Chemistry 17 displaces 4 units on student’s Study List but yields no credit toward degree. Introduction to chemical principles: numbers, measurements, chemical calculations, gas laws, solutions, acids, bases, and salts, molecular structure, and nomenclature. Collaborative learning and problem solving; introduction to chemistry laboratory practice. No grading.

20A. Chemical Structure. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: high school chemistry or equivalent background and three and one-half years of high school mathematics. Recommended: high school physics. First term of general chemistry. Survey of chemical processes, quantum chemistry, atomic and molecular structure and bonding, molecular spectroscopy. P/NP or letter grading.

20AH. Chemical Structure (Honors). (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: high school chemistry or equivalent background, high school physics, and three and one-half years of high school mathematics. Honors course parallel to course 20A. P/NP or letter grading.

20B. Chemical Energetics and Change. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 20A or 20AH, and Mathematics 31A, with grades of C- or better. Second term of general chemistry. Intermolecular forces and organization, phase behavior, chemical thermodynamics, solutions, equilibria, reaction rates and laws. P/NP or letter grading.

20BH. Chemical Energetics and Change (Honors). (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 20A and Mathematics 31A, with grades of B+ or better, or 20AH with grade of B or better. Honors course parallel to course 20B. Letter grading.

20L. General Chemistry Laboratory. (3)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 20A with grade of C- or better. Enforced corequisite: course 20B. Use of balance, volumetric techniques, volumetric and potentiometric analysis; Beer’s law, applications for environmental analysis and materials science. P/NP or letter grading.

30A. Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Reactivity. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 20B with grade of C- or better. First term of organic chemistry for Chemistry, Biochemistry, and engineering majors. Covalent bonding, shapes, stereochemistry, and acid/base properties of organic molecules. Properties, synthesis, and reactions of alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. SN2, SN1, elimination, and radical reactions. P/NP or letter grading.

30AH. Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Reactivity (Honors). (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 20B or 20BH, with grade of B+ or better. Honors course parallel to course 30A. P/NP or letter grading.

30AL. General Chemistry Laboratory II. (4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Enforced requisites: courses 20B (or 20BH) and 20L, with grades of C- or better. Enforced corequisite: course 30A or 30AH. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of chemical reactions and compounds, kinetics, separations, and spectroscopy. P/NP or letter grading.

30B. Organic Chemistry II: Reactivity, Synthesis, and Spectroscopy. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 30A or 30AH, with grade of C- or better. Second term of organic chemistry for Chemistry, Biochemistry, and engineering majors. Properties, synthesis, and reactions of alcohols, ethers, sulfur compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and carboxylic acid derivatives. Organometallic compounds. Organic spectroscopy, including mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, and proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. P/NP or letter grading.

30BL. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. (3)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30A (or 30AH) and 30AL, with grades of C- or better. Enforced corequisite: course 30B. Basic experimental techniques in organic synthesis (distillation, extraction, crystallization, and performing reactions) and organic analytical chemistry (melting and boiling point, refractive index, chromatography, IR, NMR, GC). Single and multistep synthesis of known organic molecules on microscale level. P/NP or letter grading.

30C. Organic Chemistry III: Reactivity, Synthesis, and Biomolecules. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 30B with grade of C- or better. Third term of organic chemistry for Chemistry, Biochemistry, and engineering majors. Chemistry of enolates, enamines, dicarbonyl compounds, and amines. Molecular orbital theory and conjugated pi systems; UV/vis spectroscopy. Aromaticity and reactions of aromatic molecules. Heterocycles, pericyclic reactions, carbohydrates, and lipids. P/NP or letter grading.

30CL. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. (4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, six hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30B and 30BL, with grades of C- or better. Enforced corequisite: course 30C. Modern techniques in synthetic organic and analytical organic chemistry. Semi-preparative scale, multistep synthesis of organic and organometallic molecules, including asymmetric catalysts. One- and two-dimensional multinuclear NMR techniques. Written reports and proposals. P/NP or letter grading.

88A-88Z. Lower Division Seminars. (2-2)

Seminar, two hours. Limited to freshmen/sophomores. General introduction to frontiers of molecular sciences or intensive exploration of particular theme or topic. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. P/NP or letter grading:

88A. Serendipity in Science. (2) Seminar, two hours. Limited to 20 freshmen. Inquiry into unexpected discoveries in science that have had significant impact on society and analysis of circumstances that brought these about, beginning with discovery of helium in sun by Janssen in 1868 (using newly developed field of spectroscopy). Discovery of X rays by Röntgen in 1895 and of radioactivity by Becquerel in 1896. Other topics include discoveries important to medicine, such as penicillin by Fleming in 1928 and cis -platin by Rosenberg in 1969. P/NP or letter grading.

96. Special Courses in Chemistry. (1 to 4)

Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated for maximum of 8 units. P/NP or letter grading.

98XA. PEERS Collaborative Learning Workshops for Life Sciences Majors. (1)

Laboratory, three hours. Corequisite: associated undergraduate lecture course in chemistry and biochemistry for life sciences majors. Development of intuition and problem-solving skills in collaborative learning environment. May be repeated four times, but only 1 unit may be applied toward graduation. P/NP grading.

98XB. PEERS Collaborative Learning Workshops for Physical Sciences and Engineering Majors. (1)

Laboratory, three hours. Corequisite: associated undergraduate lecture course in chemistry and biochemistry for physical sciences and engineering majors. Development of intuition and problem-solving skills in collaborative learning environment. May be repeated four times, but only 1 unit may be applied toward graduation. P/NP grading.

Upper Division Courses

103. Environmental Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 30B, 30BL, 110A, 153A (or 153AH), 153L. Chemical aspects of air and water pollution, solid waste disposal, energy resources, and pesticide effects. Chemical reactions in environment and effect of chemical processes on environment. P/NP or letter grading.

M104. Environmental Chemistry Laboratory. (4)

(Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M140.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisite: course 20B. Laboratory experience for students who wish to pursue careers in environmental science. Essential laboratory procedures to be performed in context of timely environmental issues involving smog formation, acid rain, and ozone depletion. Hands-on experience using scientific instruments and analytical techniques appropriate for environmental assessment. P/NP or letter grading.

C105. Introduction to Chemistry of Biology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 153A with grade of C- or better. Introduction to chemical biology. Topics include computational chemical biology, utility of synthesis in biochemical research, peptidomimetics, designed reagents for cellular imaging, natural product biosynthesis, protein engineering and directed evolution, cell biology of metal ions, imaging metal ions in cells, metal-containing drugs. Concurrently scheduled with course CM205A. P/NP or letter grading.

C108. Mass Spectrometry for Chemists and Biochemists. (2)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course 153A. Introduction to principles and practice of organic and inorganic mass spectrometry. Topics include EI, CI, ICPMS, GC/MS, LC/MS, ESI, MALDI, MS/MS protein identification, and proteomics. Concurrently scheduled with course C208. P/NP or letter grading.

110A. Physical Chemistry: Chemical Thermodynamics. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisites: course 20B, Mathematics 32A or 3C (for life sciences majors), Physics 1A, 1B, and 1C (may be taken concurrently), or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH (may be taken concurrently), or 6A, 6B, and 6C (may be taken concurrently). Fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemical and phase equilibria, thermodynamics of solutions, electrochemistry. P/NP or letter grading.

110B. Physical Chemistry: Introduction to Statistical Mechanics and Kinetics. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisites: courses 110A, 113A, Mathematics 32B. Kinetic theory of gases, principles of statistical mechanics, statistical thermodynamics, equilibrium structure and free energy, relaxation and transport phenomena, macroscopic chemical kinetics, molecular-level reaction dynamics. P/NP or letter grading.

113A. Physical Chemistry: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisites: course 20B, Mathematics 32A, 32B, 33B, Physics 1A, 1B, and 1C, or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH, or 6A, 6B, and 6C, with grades of C- or better. Departure from classical mechanics: Schrödinger versus Newton equations; model systems: particle-in-box, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor, and hydrogen atom; approximation methods: perturbation and variational methods; many-electron atoms, spin, and Pauli principle, chemical bonding. P/NP or letter grading.

C113B. Physical Chemistry: Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 113A. Interaction of radiation with matter, microwave spectroscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, vibrations in polyatomic molecules, electronic spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Concurrently scheduled with course C213B. P/NP or letter grading.

114. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (5)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30AL, 110A, and 113A, with grades of C- or better. Enforced corequisite: course 110B or C113B. Lectures include techniques of physical measurement, error analysis and statistics, special topics. Laboratory includes spectroscopy, thermodynamic measurements, and chemical dynamics. P/NP or letter grading.

114H. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Honors). (5)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30AL, 110A, and 113A, with grades of B or better. Enforced corequisite: course 110B or C113B. Lectures include techniques of physical measurement, error analysis and statistics, special topics. Laboratory includes topics in physical chemistry to be selected in consultation with instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

C115A-C115B. Quantum Chemistry. (4-4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 113A, Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, with grades of C- or better. Recommended: knowledge of differential equations equivalent to Mathematics 134 or 135 or Physics 131 and of analytic mechanics equivalent to Physics 105A. Course C115A or Physics 115B with grade of C- or better is requisite to C115B. Students entering course C115A are normally expected to take course C115B in following term. Designed for chemistry students with serious interest in quantum chemistry. Postulates and systematic development of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics; expansion theorems; wells; oscillators; angular momentum; hydrogen atom; matrix techniques; approximation methods; time dependent problems; atoms; spectroscopy; magnetic resonance; chemical bonding. May be concurrently scheduled with courses C215A-C215B. P/NP or letter grading.

C115C. Advanced Quantum Chemistry: Applications. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 113A, C115B. Topics in quantum chemistry selected from molecular structure, collision processes, theory of solids, symmetry and its applications, and theory of electromagnetic radiation. Concurrently scheduled with course C215C. P/NP or letter grading.

M117. Structure, Patterns, and Polyhedra. (5)

(Same as Honors Collegium M180.) Lecture, four hours; activity, two hours. Exploration of structures and their geometric underpinnings, with examples and applications from architecture (space frames, domes), biology (enzyme complexes, viruses), chemistry (symmetry, molecular cages), design (tiling), engineering (space filling), and physics (crystal structures) to effect working knowledge of symmetry, two-dimensional patterns, and three-dimensional solids. P/NP or letter grading.

118. Colloidal Dynamics Laboratory. (4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 110A and 110B, with grades of B or better, or equivalent statistical mechanics courses from engineering, mathematics, or physics. One aspect of dispersions of microscale particles in viscous liquids is that such dispersions can be used as visual model systems for studying phases that chemistry undergraduate students typically learn about for nanoscale and molecular systems, yet they do not see. Temperature continuously excites molecules and causes rearrangements, giving dynamic views of macromolecules and particles in many fields, including cell and molecular biology, chemical engineering, chemistry, materials science, and physics. Letter grading.

M120. Soft Matter Laboratory. (4)

(Same as Physics M180G.) Laboratory, four hours. P/NP or letter grading.

121. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 110B. Recommended: course 113A. Topics of considerable research interest presented at level suitable for students who have completed junior-year courses in physical chemistry. P/NP or letter grading.

C123A-C123B. Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics. (4-4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 110B or 156. Recommended: course 113A. Rigorous presentation of fundamentals of classical thermodynamics. Principles of statistical thermodynamics: probability, ensembles, partition functions, independent molecules, and perfect gas. Applications of classical and statistical thermodynamics selected from diatomic and polyatomic gases, solid and fluid states, phase equilibria, electric and magnetic effects, ortho-para hydrogen, chemical equilibria, reaction rates, imperfect gas, nonelectrolyte and electrolyte solutions, surface phenomena, high polymers, gravitation. May be concurrently scheduled with courses C223A-C223B. P/NP or letter grading.

125. Computers in Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours. Preparation: working knowledge of Fortran IV or PL/1. Requisites: courses 110A, 110B, 113A. Discussion of computer techniques, including matrix manipulation, solution of differential equations, data acquisition, and instrumental control, and their applications to chemical problems in quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics. P/NP or letter grading.

C126A. Computational Methods for Chemists. (4)

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours. Preparation: programming experience in either BASIC, Fortran, C, C++, Java, or Pascal. Requisites: course 110A, Mathematics 33B. Theoretical, numerical, and programming tools for constructing new chemical applications, including simple force fields and resulting statistical mechanics for simple molecules, simple ab-initio methods for organic molecules and nanotubes, and classical dynamics and spectroscopy. Concurrently scheduled with course C226A. P/NP or letter grading.

CM127. Synthetic Biology for Biofuels. (4)

(Same as Chemical Engineering CM127.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 153A, Life Sciences 3. Engineering microorganisms for complex phenotype is common goal of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Production of advanced biofuels involves designing and constructing novel metabolic networks in cells. Such efforts require profound understanding of biochemistry, protein structure, and biological regulations and are aided by tools in bioinformatics, systems biology, and molecular biology. Fundamentals of metabolic biochemistry, protein structure and function, and bioinformatics. Use of systems modeling for metabolic networks to design microorganisms for energy applications. Concurrently scheduled with course CM227. Letter grading.

136. Organic Structural Methods. (5)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 30C and 30CL, with grades of C- or better. Laboratory course in organic structure determination by chemical and spectroscopic methods; microtechniques. P/NP or letter grading.

C140. Bionanotechnology. (4)

Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 30C, 110A. Basic physical, chemical, and biological principles in bionanotechnology; materials and strategies for top-down and bottom-up fabrication of ordered biologically derived molecules, characterization and detection techniques, and biomimetic materials and applications at nanoscale. Concurrently scheduled with course C240. P/NP or letter grading.

C143A. Structure and Mechanism in Organic Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 30C and 30CL (may be taken concurrently), 110B, and 113A, with grades of C- or better. Mechanisms of organic reactions. Acidity and acid catalysis; linear free energy relationships; isotope effects. Molecular orbital theory; photochemistry; pericyclic reactions. May be concurrently scheduled with course C243A. P/NP or letter grading.

C143B. Mechanism and Structure in Organic Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course C143A with grade of C- or better. Mechanisms of organic reactions; structure and detection of reactive intermediates. May be concurrently scheduled with course C243B. P/NP or letter grading.

144. Practical and Theoretical Introductory Organic Synthesis. (5)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30C and 30CL, with grades of C- or better. Lectures on modern synthetic reactions and processes, with emphasis on stereospecific methods for carbon-carbon bond formation. Laboratory methods of synthetic organic chemistry, including reaction techniques, synthesis of natural products, and molecules of theoretical interest. P/NP or letter grading.

C145. Theoretical and Computational Organic Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; computer laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 30C, 113A. Applications of quantum mechanical concepts and methods to understand and predict organic structures and reactivities. Computational modeling methods, including laboratory experience with force-field and quantum mechanical computer calculations. Concurrently scheduled with course C245. P/NP or letter grading.

153A. Biochemistry: Introduction to Structure, Enzymes, and Metabolism. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 14D or 30B, with grade of C- or better. Recommended: Life Sciences 2, 3. Structure of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids; enzyme catalysis and principles of metabolism, including glycolysis, citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. P/NP or letter grading.

153AH. Biochemistry: Introduction to Structure, Enzymes, and Metabolism (Honors). (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 14D or 30B, with grade of C- or better. Recommended: Life Sciences 2, 3. Honors course parallel to course 153A. P/NP or letter grading.

153B. Biochemistry: DNA, RNA, and Protein Synthesis. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisites: course 153A or 153AH, Life Sciences 2, 3. Nucleotide metabolism; DNA replication; DNA repair; transcription machinery; regulation of transcription; RNA structure and processing; protein synthesis and processing. P/NP or letter grading.

153BH. Biochemistry: DNA, RNA, and Protein Synthesis (Honors). (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisites: course 153A or 153AH, Life Sciences 2, 3. Honors course parallel to course 153B. P/NP or letter grading.

153C. Biochemistry: Biosynthetic and Energy Metabolism and Its Regulation. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 153A or 153AH. Metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, and lipids; photosynthetic metabolism and assimilation of inorganic nutrients; regulation of these processes. P/NP or letter grading.

153CH. Biochemistry: Biosynthetic and Energy Metabolism and Its Regulation (Honors). (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Requisite: course 153A or 153AH. Honors course parallel to course 153C. P/NP or letter grading.

153D. Biochemistry: Introduction to Protein Structural Biology. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 153A, Life Sciences 3. Proteins are diverse set of macromolecules that perform critical functions within cells, ranging from enzymes that catalyze metabolic reactions to proteins that enable pathogens to cause disease. Students are introduced to the field of protein structural biology, which seeks to understand the molecular basis of protein function through visualizing atomic structures and by investigating how alterations in protein structure affects function. Students gain fundamental understanding of protein structure and its relationship to function and learn how experimental and computational methods are used to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins.

Hands-on training in computer graphics programs and online tools used to visualize and analyze protein structures. Letter grading.

 

153L. Biochemical Methods I. (4)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 14CL and 14D, or 30B and 30BL, and 153A or 153AH (may be taken concurrently), with grades of C- or better. Integrated term-long project involving characterization of enzyme purified from meat obtained at local butcher. Techniques include ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography, protein and enzyme assays, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel exclusion chromatography, and enzyme kinetic analysis. P/NP or letter grading.

154. Biochemical Methods II. (5)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 153A or 153AH, 153B or 153BH, and 153L, with grades of C- or better. Recommended: course 156. Two to three major laboratory projects using biochemical laboratory techniques to investigate contemporary problems in biochemistry. Topics include transcription activation, molecular basis of DNA-protein interactions, biochemical basis of platelet activation, and initiation of blood clotting cascade. Experiments entail characterizing function of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids involved in these processes. P/NP or letter grading.

156. Physical Biochemistry. (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 110A, 153A. Biochemical kinetics; solution thermodynamics of biochemical systems; multiple equilibria; hydrodynamics; energy levels, spectroscopy, and bonding; topics from structural, statistical, and electrochemical methods of biochemistry. P/NP or letter grading.

C159A. Mechanisms in Regulation of Transcription I. (2)

First five weeks. Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 153B, 154. Mechanisms that control transcription in bacteria. Repression and activation at promoters. Sigma factors and polymerase binding proteins. Signal transduction pathways in transcription. Control of termination. Concurrently scheduled with course C259A. P/NP or letter grading.

C159B. Mechanisms in Regulation of Transcription II. (2)

Second five weeks. Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 153B, 154. Eukaryotic general transcriptional apparatus; sequence-specific promoter recognition; mechanisms of transcriptional activation and repression, including role of chromatin structure; transcription factors as targets of signal transduction pathways; transcription factors in embryogenesis. Concurrently scheduled with course C259B. P/NP or letter grading.

CM160A. Introduction to Bioinformatics. (4)

(Same as Computer Science CM121.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: Biostatistics 100A or 110A or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A or 110A, and Computer Science 180 or Program in Computing 60 with grade of C- or better. Introduction to bioinformatics and methodologies, with emphasis on concepts and inventing new bioinformatic methods. Focus on sequence analysis and alignment algorithms. Concurrently scheduled with course CM260A. P/NP or letter grading.

CM160B. Algorithms in Bioinformatics and Systems Biology. (4)

(Formerly numbered C160B.) (Same as Computer Science CM122.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours. Enforced requisite: course CM160A or Computer Science CM121 with grade of C- or better. Recommended: Computer Science 32 or Program in Computing 60, Statistics 100A, 110A. Development and application of computational approaches to biological questions. Understanding of mechanisms for determining statistical significance of computationally derived results. Development of foundation for innovative work in bioinformatics and systems biology. Concurrently scheduled with course CM260B. Letter grading.

C161A. Plant Biochemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Requisite: course 153C. Introduction to distinctive features of plant biochemistry. Topics include photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, plant cell wall metabolism, and secondary metabolism in relation to stress. Concurrently scheduled with course C261A. P/NP or letter grading.

C164. Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine. (2 to 4)

Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 153A and either 153B or 153C, with grades of C- or better. Biochemical reactivity of dioxygen, its role in mitochondrial metabolism, neurodegenerative diseases, apoptosis, and aging. Discussion of radical reactions, how they are harnessed to achieve enzyme catalysis, and how free radicals contribute to or regulate essential biological processes. These same reactions “run amok” under certain types of stress and can contribute to wide variety of diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s diseases), mitochondrial diseases, atherosclerosis, and aging. Concurrently scheduled with course C264. P/NP or letter grading.

C165. Metabolic Control by Protein Modification. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 153A, 153B, 153C. Biochemical basis of controlling metabolic pathways by posttranslational modification of proteins, including phosphorylation and methylation reactions. Concurrently scheduled with course C265. Letter grading.

CM170. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Photosynthetic Apparatus. (2 to 4)

(Same as Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M170.) Lecture, two to three hours; discussion, zero to two hours. Requisites: courses 153A and 153B, or Life Sciences 3, and course 153L. Recommended: courses 153C, 154, Life Sciences 4. Light harvesting, photochemistry, electron transfer, carbon fixation, carbohydrate metabolism, pigment synthesis in chloroplasts and bacteria. Assembly of photosynthetic membranes and regulation of genes encoding those components. Emphasis on understanding of experimental approaches. Concurrently scheduled with course C270. P/NP or letter grading.

171. Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 30B with grade of C- or better. Chemical bonding; structure and bonding in solid state; main group, transition metal, lanthanide and actinide compounds and reactions; catalysis, spectroscopy, special topics. P/NP or letter grading.

172. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (4)

(Formerly numbered C172.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 171 with grade of C- or better. Systematic approach to modern inorganic chemistry, structure and bonding of inorganic molecules and solids, structure/reactivity relationships, vibrational spectra of complexes, electronic structure and ligand-field theory, mechanisms of inorganic reactions, bonding and spectroscopy of organometallic compounds, transition metals in catalysis and biology. P/NP or letter grading.

C174. Inorganic and Metalorganic Laboratory Methods. (5)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30CL and 172, with grades of C- or better. Synthesis of inorganic compounds, including air-sensitive materials; Schlenck techniques; chromatographic and ion exchange methods; spectroscopic characterization and literature applications. Concurrently scheduled with course C274. P/NP or letter grading.

C175. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. (4)

Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 110A, 110B, 113A, and 172, with grades of C- or better. Survey of inorganic reactions; mechanistic principles; electronic structure of metal ions; transition-metal coordination chemistry; inner- and outer-sphere and chelate complexes; substitution, isomerization, and racemization reactions; stereochemistry; oxidation/reduction, free/radical, polymerization, and photochemical reactions of inorganic species. May be concurrently scheduled with course C275. P/NP or letter grading.

C176. Group Theory and Applications to Inorganic Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 113A and 172, with grades of C- or better. Group theoretical methods; molecular orbital theory; ligand-field theory; electronic spectroscopy; vibrational spectroscopy. May be concurrently scheduled with course C276A. P/NP or letter grading.

C179. Biological Inorganic Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 153A (or 153AH), 171. Role of metal ions in biology. Topics include interactions of metal ions with proteins, nucleic acids, and other biological molecules; mechanisms of metal ion transport and storage; introduction to metalloenzyme; metalloproteins in electron transfer, respiration, and photosynthesis; metals in medicine. Concurrently scheduled with course C279. P/NP or letter grading.

C180. Solid-State Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 172 with grade of C- or better. Survey of new materials and methods for their preparation and characterization, with emphasis on band theory and its relationship to chemical, optical, transport, and magnetic properties, leading to deeper understanding of these materials. Concurrently scheduled with course C280. P/NP or letter grading.

C181. Polymer Chemistry. (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 30B, 110A. Synthesis of organic and inorganic macromolecules, thermodynamic and statistical mechanical descriptions of unique properties of polymers, polymer characterization methods, and special topics such as conductive and biomedical polymers and polymeric reagents in synthesis. Concurrently scheduled with course C281. P/NP or letter grading.

184. Chemical Instrumentation. (5)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30CL and 110A, with grades of C- or better. Theory and practice of instrumental techniques of chemical and structural analysis, including atomic absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, polarography, X-ray fluorescence, and other modern methods. P/NP or letter grading.

C185. Materials Chemistry Laboratory. (5)

Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 30AL, 110A, 113A, 171. Materials synthesis and physical properties of complex materials. Combines synthetic skills with fundamental physical understanding and characterization in approximately equal proportions to relate materials synthesis to materials function. Concurrently scheduled with course C285. Letter grading.

192A-192B. Undergraduate Practicum in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (4-4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; workshop, two hours. Enforced requisite: Life Sciences 73SL or declared General Chemistry major with approved course focus on secondary school teaching. Intended for students who are planning careers in secondary science chemistry teaching. Complements service learning California Teach science courses that involve teaching field experiences in middle school and high school classrooms. Examination of chemistry issues such as chemical storage and use, waste management, laboratory organization, safety, and techniques. P/NP or letter grading.

193A. Journal Club Seminars: UC LEADS and MARC. (2)

Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors in undergraduate research training programs such as UC LEADS and MARC or those who have strong commitment to pursue graduate studies in natural sciences, engineering, or mathematics. Weekly reading and oral presentations of research or research papers selected from current literature. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

193B. Journal Club Seminars: Chemistry and Biochemistry. (2)

Seminar, three hours. Limited to undergraduate students. Discussion of readings selected from current literature in particular field. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

194. Research Group Seminars: Chemistry and Biochemistry. (1)

Seminar, three hours. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in physical, organic, or inorganic chemistry or biochemistry. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

196A. Research Apprenticeship in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (2 to 4)

Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Limited to juniors/seniors. Entry-level research apprenticeship for upper division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Consult department for additional information regarding requirements, enrollment petitions, and written proposal deadlines. May be repeated for maximum of 8 units. Individual contract required. P/NP grading.

196B. Research Apprenticeship in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (2 to 4)

Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Enforced requisite: course 196A (8 units). Limited to juniors/seniors. Research apprenticeship for upper division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Consult department for additional information regarding requirements, enrollment petitions, and written proposal deadlines. May be taken for maximum of 4 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

199. Directed Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (2 to 4)

Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Enforced requisite: course 196A (8 units). Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating report required. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.