Jun 29, 2017
Professor Jeffrey Zink
Professor Jeffrey Zink and alumnus Monty Liong (BS '04, PhD '09) are co-authors on paper featured in the first of ACS Nano’s Anniversary Virtual Issues.
 
The paper, which has over 1000 citations, is featured in the journal’s June 2017 “Celebrating 10 Years of Nanomedicine Research” virtual issue.
 
In celebration of the tenth anniversary of ACS Nano’s first issue, coming August 2017, their editors are curating small topical collections on a number of key topics selected by the editors who handle manuscripts in these fields. “You will see in these collections how we try to accelerate advances in the field by laying out challenges and opportunities in forward-looking articles and then report these advances as they are made,” the announcement states.
 
Titled “Multifunctional Inorganic Nanoparticles for Imaging, Targeting, and Drug Delivery”, the paper was published in the May 1, 2008 issue of ACS Nano. Liong was the first author and Zink was the senior author. The other co-authors were Jie Lu, Michael Kovochich, Tian Xia, Stefan G. Ruehm, Andre E. Nel, and Fuyuhiko Tamanoi.  
 
A figure from the paper – a schematic illustration of multifunctional nanoparticles showing iron oxide nanocrystals encapsulated within mesoporous silica, hydrophobic anticancer drugs stored inside the pores, and surface modifications with phosphonate and folic acid targeting ligands.
 
Jeffrey Zink (pictured above) has been a faculty member in the UCLA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry since 1970. He is a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and a member of the UCLA California NanoSystems Institute. Zink is an authority on triboluminescence, photochemistry and photophysics of metal-containing molecules, and on nanomachines. He has published over 500 papers and is a Thomson-Reuters Highly Cited Author. Zink’s current research is focused on fundamental spectroscopic investigation of large metal-containing molecules and on design, operation and biological applications of functional nanomaterials including nanomachines such as valves and impellers.
 

Monty Liong (pictured right) received his B.S. in chemistry at UCLA in 2004 and his Ph.D. in chemistry in 2009 under the direction of Zink. After receiving his Ph.D., Liong went on to Harvard where he was a post-doctoral fellow working at the Center for Systems Biology, Richard B. Simches Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital in Ralph Weissleder’s lab. He is now a Senior Scientist at Exponent, a multi-disciplinary engineering and scientific consulting firm in San Francisco.

To learn more about Zink’s research, visit his group’s website