Analytical Chemistry

Featured Research

Synthesis and Solid-State Rotational Dynamics of Molecular Gyroscopes with a Robust and Low Density Structure Built with a Phenylene Rotator and a Tri(meta-terphenyl)methyl Stator
 — Prof. Miguel A. Garcia-Garibay
Molecular Machines

Dr. Miguel Garcia-Garibay explores the effects of increased stator size on the solid-state dynamics of these crystalline models for molecular machines.
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From the Department’s Molecular Instrumentation Center (MIC) to the set of user/core facilities at the California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI) to specialty assays, cleanrooms and high-throughput labs throughout the campus, UCLA provides the full spectrum of state-of-the-art instrumentation and one-of-a-kind high-tech measuring devices.

These instruments enable us to carry a high degree of Analytical chemistry research.

Our faculty are leaders in:

  • single-molecule detection
  • scanning probe and super-resolution microscopies
  • NMR imaging, and
  • bioanalytical mass spectroscopy
Moreover, we collaborate with colleagues throughout the university on developing and making available new generations of these technologies.

 

 

Our Research Facility

Professor Anne M. Andrews
Professor Anne Andrews’ research group is centered on understanding how the serotonin neurotransmitter system modulates complex behaviors including anxiety, mood, stress responsiveness, and learning and memory. The expression and function of the serotonin transporter is studied in human peripheral blood cells and lymphoblast cell lines, and in genetic and pharmacologic mouse models.
Professor Louis-Serge Bouchard
Professor Louis Bouchard and his group conduct research in physical chemistry and biomedical engineering. His team deals with the development of novel materials, contrast agents, drug delivery systems, the study of flows in biological systems and groundwater, high frequency electromagnetic and circuit design, condensed matter physics, catalysis, medical imaging and cancer research.
Professor James U. Bowie
Professor James Bowie and his group are fascinated by protein structure, folding and stabilization. This interest has led them into three main areas: (1) learning how membrane proteins fold and how they can be stabilized; (2) the structures and biological functions of a biological polymer they discovered that is formed by a very common protein module called a SAM domain; and (3) developing and stabilizing enzyme pathways for the production of biofuels.
Professor Xiangfeng Duan
Professor Xiangfeng Duan and his group's interests include nanoscale materials, devices and their applications in future electronics, energy science and biomedical science.
Professor Miguel A. Garcia-Garibay
Research in the Garcia-Garibay group is based on a deep knowledge of molecular and supramolecular structure to addresses questions of chemical reactivity and molecular dynamics in the solid state. By controlling reactivity and motion, they are able to engineer reactions in crystals, develop green chemical processes, and, with fine-tuned amphidynamic crystals, advance the development of artificial molecular machines.
Professor James K. Gimzewski
Professor James Gimzewski focuses on nanoscale science and technology with an emphasis on mechanics on the nanoscale. His research consists of: (1) Nanomechanical dynamics and nanoarchitechtonics of living cells. This work is related to cancer, the action of drugs, environmental factors and other mutations in individual cells. The research pioneers the role of mechanics and cellular motion with the aim of developing new forms of medical diagnoses at the single cell level. (2) Use of biochemistry and AFM to gene profile DNA on the single molecule level. (3) Production of compact high energy beams of neutrons, photons, ions, and electrons using point source emitters coupled with piezoelectric and pyroelectric effects.
Professor Yung-Ya Lin
Professor Yung-Ya Lin and his group study theory and applications in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, microscopy & imaging, channeling progress in fundamental physics. His research leads into significant improvements in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging with valuable applications in biomedical sciences.
Professor Joseph A. Loo
The research interests of Professor Loo's group include the development and application of bioanalytical methods for the structural characterization of proteins and post-translational modifications, proteomics-based research, and the elucidation of disease. The composition and structure of noncovalently-bound protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and ion mobility.
Professor Heather D. Maynard
The Maynard group focuses on polymer chemistry and nano medicine. We design and synthesize polymeric mimics of natural molecules with the purpose of stabilizing proteins and siRNA. These materials are applied to wound healing, diabetes, and for the treatment of cancer. We also prepare polymers for conjugation of proteins to surfaces in specific orientations for diagnostics and biomaterials that control cell behavior.
Professor Sabeeha S. Merchant
The Merchant research program focuses on trace metal metabolism using Chlamydomonas as a reference organism. The group uses a combination of classical genetics, genomics and biochemistry to discover mechanisms of trace metal homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, especially mechanisms for reducing the quota or for recycling in situations of deficiency.
Professor John T. Wasson
Professor John Wasson's research interest is in cosmochemistry. He studies the chemical composition of the solar system, the solar nebula, and meteoritics. One of his projects combines chemistry, biology and geology; his team is investigating the association between the accretion to the Earth of large, kilometer-size objects and massive biological extinctions. The chemical evidence for the accretionary events are large enhancements of noble-metal concentrations in thin sediment layers. The recent determinations of Ir in a sea-sediment core have allowed them to determine the size of the impacting body that produced the Australasian tektites.
Professor Paul S. Weiss
Professor Paul Weiss leads an interdisciplinary research group which includes chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists. Their work focuses on the atomic-scale chemical, physical, optical, mechanical and electronic properties of surfaces and supramolecular assemblies. He and his students have developed new techniques to expand the applicability and chemical specificity of scanning probe microscopies. They have applied these and other tools to the study of catalysis, self- and directed assembly, physical models of biological systems, and molecular and nano-scale electronics. They work to advance nanofabrication down to ever smaller scales and greater chemical specificity in order to connect, to operate, and to test molecular devices.
Professor Shimon Weiss
Professor Shimon Weiss and his group develop and apply ultrahigh-resolution, ultrahigh-sensitivity fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy tools to solving outstanding problems in chemistry & biology. Specifically, they utilize (i) single molecule spectroscopy to study conformational dynamics and transient interactions of proteins; (ii) superresolution and /or ultrasensitive imaging methods to watch life process in live cells on the molecular scale; (iii) activate and/or perturb physiological processes in live zebrafish on the single cell level; (iv) develop unique reagents and chemistries to carry out research topics mentioned.